A Step-By-Step Guide Car Accident

By | July 8, 2018
Sponsored Ads

STEP 1: CHECK YOURSELF FOR INJURIES.

If you’re injured, call 108 or ask someone else to do so. If you’re seriously injured, try not to move, and wait for emergency personnel.”Car Accident: A Step-By-Step Guide”,”Car Accident: A Step-By-Step Guide”,”Car Accident: A Step-By-Step Guide”,

STEP 2: CHECK ON THE WELL-BEING OF YOUR PASSENGERS.

If you’re not too hurt to move, check on the other passengers in your car. If anyone’s injured, get on the phone with emergency services or ask a bystander to call for help.

STEP 3: GET TO SAFETY.

If you’re able to, move to the side of the road or a sidewalk. If your car is safe to drive and is causing a hazard where it is, pull it to the side of the road. Otherwise, leave it where it is and get yourself to safety.

STEP 4: CALL 108

Whether an accident is considered a minor fender-bender or a major collision, calling the police is important — and in some states, it’s legally required. The responding officers will fill out an accident report and document the scene. If the police can’t come to the scene of the accident, you can go to the nearest police station and complete a report yourself, according to the III.

Sponsored Ads

STEP 5: WAIT FOR HELP.

Turn off your engine, turn on your hazard lights and use road flares to warn other vehicles to slow down.

STEP 6: EXCHANGE INFORMATION.

After making sure you and any passengers are uninjured, exchange contact and insurance information with the other driver. According to the III, the most important information includes:

Get a Police Report

Filing a police report right away is ideal, but you may be able to file a report later on if you didn’t contact 108 immediately after the accident. While the law varies from state to state, many police departments allow reports to be filed up to 72 hours following an accident. But if both cars have left the scene, the information won’t be as accurate. Some states require you to report an accident, and you could be cited if you didn’t. For instance, in Oregon, if damage to the vehicle you were driving is more than  you need to file a report. In Ohio, as long as nobody was hurt, you don’t have to call the police. Unless you know your state laws well, it’s best to call and file a report.

Sponsored Ads

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *